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The Ending of Kate Chopins The Awakening


the Ending of Kate Chopins The Awakening

be a fortuitous turn of events. Richards rushes to the Mallards' house, where he and Mrs. The line establishes that Louise's heart condition is more of a metaphor for her emotional state than a medical reality. Upon hearing the news of, brently Mallard 's tragic railroad accident death in the newspaper office, his friend. Mallard to let her enter because she is afraid that the grieving widow will make herself ill, but Mrs. Mallard knows that she will mourn her loving husband's death, but she also predicts many years of freedom, which she welcomes. The latter emotion eventually takes precedence in her thoughts. Mallard faces conflicting emotions of grief at her husband's death and exultation at the prospects for freedom in the remainder of her life. Mallard of Brently's death.

the Ending of Kate Chopins The Awakening

Richards moves in front of him to hide him from seeing his wife when she cries out. After discovering that her husband has died in a train accident, Mrs. Mallard's exclamations of "Free! Beyond the question of female independence, Louise seems to suggest that although Brently Mallard has always treated their relationship with the best of intentions, any human connection with such an effect of permanence and intensity, despite its advantages, must also be a limiting factor. Although Chopin does not specifically cite the contemporary second-class situation of women in the text, Mrs. By the time the doctors arrive, she has died from "heart disease purportedly from "the joy that kills.". Even Louise's physical description seems to hint at her personality, as Chopin associates her youthful countenance with her potential for the future while mentioning lines that "bespoke repression and even a certain strength." Although neither her sister nor Brently's friend Richards would be likely. Mallard's presumed frailty seems to be largely a result story Anlaysis on Before and After of psychological repression rather than truly physiological factors. Finally, she realizes despite her initial opposition that she is now free. In the first paragraph of "The Story of an Hour Chopin uses the term "heart trouble" primarily in a medical sense, but over the course of the story, Mrs. Mallard as a sympathetic character with strength and insight. In particular, American wives in the late nineteenth century were legally bound to their husbands' power and status, but because widows did not bear the responsibility of finding or following a husband, they gained more legal recognition and often had more control over their lives.


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